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Entry no.: 389

15 Dec 2007, 9:39 PM

Tags: , , , , , ,

Comments: 64

Design Woody Allen and the Windsor font

Is this fetish or brand identity?

White Windsor typeface on black

White type on black opening titles rolling on old jazz or classical music became a part of Woody Allen brand.

In a time when movie titles become more and more of a clueless "me too!" affair1, Woody Allen’s unique (and relentless) typographic style is entirely praiseworthy. His white type on black opening titles rolling on old jazz or classical music became a part of Woody Allen brand, just like his neurotic dialogues and "his black-rimmed glasses"2 are.

The white type being EF Windsor Elongated (later edit: or a heavier weight of EF Windsor Light Condensed, as some of the readers suggested) by Elsner+Flake foundry.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Here is how Fonts.com describes "EF Windsor family":

Windsor is an unusual design cut by Stephenson Blake3 in 1905. Windsor is a bold face with heavy rounded serifs and strong diagonal stress. Capitals M and W are widely splayed, P and R have very large upper bowls. The Lowercase a h m and n of the Windsor font have angled right hand stems, e has an angled cross-stroke. The overall effect is one of friendliness and warmth. Use the Windsor font in advertising, on posters and for general display work.

Ed Benguiat, the "printer"

How did Woody Allen chose this typeface? In a previous iteration of this post, the mystery of Woody Allen's typeface of choice was solved by this amazing story posted by Randy J. Hunt in the comments (thank you, Randy):

Benguiat had an affinity for Windsor and suggested it to him that morning. He’s used it in every film since.

I'm currently taking a typeface design course with Ed Benguiat, and just last night he described a time when he would have breakfast at the same New Jersey diner every morning. Among the other that would dine there was Woody Allen. On one occasion, referring to Benguiat as a "printer," Allen asked him what a good typeface was. Benguiat had an affinity for Windsor and suggested it to him that morning. He's used it in every film since.

This New Jersey breakfast with Ed Benguiat must've happened sometime between '75 and '77, because in Love and Death (1975) the titles (although already white type on black background) are set in another serif, while in Annie Hall (1977) Windsor is there, in the largest size of all his titles.

It is also interesting that after Annie Hall (1977) Woody Allen betrays WindsorInteriors (1978) titles are set in a News Gothic-ish sans serif—only to return to it for Mahattan in 1979.

Update: Mr. Benguiat confirmed—thank you, sir—and shed further light on this in comment № 50 below:

All very nicely worded and all technically correct. Thank you all for the factual feedback on Mr. Allen. One other person needs a little thanks for his opinion on the use of Windsor was Corbet Monica, who was at the dinner every Sat & Sun. He played in the movie "Broadway Danny Rose."

Story confirmed. What a beautiful surprise!

***

Down to business

So I dug up my movies (okay, most of them are borrowed, while Stardust Memories, September, Another Woman, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Alice and Shadows and Fog screenshots are from Scott Steffens' Contact Sheet) and took some captures.

Woody Allen's filmography as a director, as referenced by IMDB, non-compliant titles in red:

1. What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“What's Up, Tiger Lily“ title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

2. Take the Money and Run (1969, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Take the Money and Run” (1969) title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

3. Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story (1971, IMDb), TV, title needed but most probably non-compliant;

4. Bananas (1971, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Bananas” (1971) title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

5. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* But Were Afraid to Ask (1972, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* But Were Afraid to Ask” (1972) title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

6. Sleeper (1973, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Sleeper” (1973) title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

7. Love and Death (1975, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Love and Death” (1975) title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

8. Annie Hall (1977, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Annie Hall (1977) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

9. Interiors (1978, IMDb, Wikipedia) doesn't comply:

“Interiors” (1978)  title sequence without Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

10. Manhattan (1979, IMDb, Wikipedia)—doesn't have an opening title (except the famous monologue and a "Manhattan" neon building signage) but its closing credits comply to the rule:

Manhattan (1979) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

11. Stardust Memories (1980, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Stardust Memories (1980) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

12. A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy (1982, IMDb, Wikipedia):

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy (1982) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

13. Zelig (1983, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Zelig (1983) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

14. Broadway Danny Rose (1984, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Broadway Danny Rose (1984) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

15. The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985, IMDb, Wikipedia):

The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

16. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

17. Radio Days (1987, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Radio Days (1987) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

18. September (1987, IMDb, Wikipedia):

September (1987) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

19. Another Woman (1988, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Another Woman (1988) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

20. New York Stories (1989, segment "Oedipus Wrecks", IMDb, Wikipedia):

New York Stories (1989) (segment "Oedipus Wrecks") title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

21. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

22. Alice (1990, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Alice (1990) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

23. Shadows and Fog (1992, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Shadows and Fog (1992) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

24. Husbands and Wives (1992, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Husbands and Wives (1992) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

25. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

26. Bullets Over Broadway (1994, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by MZ:

Bullets Over Broadway (1994) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

27. Don't Drink the Water (1994, TV, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Don't Drink the Water (1994, TV) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

28. Mighty Aphrodite (1995, IMDb, Wikipedia)—it's interesting that this one is the only title I found set on two lines (the rest are one-liners):

Mighty Aphrodite (1995) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

29. Everyone Says I Love You (1996, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Everyone Says I Love You (1996) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

30. Deconstructing Harry (1997, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Deconstructing Harry (1997) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

31. Celebrity (1998, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Celebrity (1998) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

32. Sweet and Lowdown (1999, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Sweet and Lowdown (1999) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

33. Small Time Crooks (2000, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Small Time Crooks (2000) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

34. The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

35. Sounds from a Town I Love (2001, TV, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Sounds from a Town I Love (2001, TV) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

Click here to watch Sounds from a Town I Love on YouTube.

36. Hollywood Ending (2002, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Tim Gerdes:

Hollywood Ending (2002) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

37. Anything Else (2003, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Anything Else (2003) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

38. Melinda and Melinda (2004, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Melinda and Melinda (2004) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

39. Match Point (2005, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Match Point (2005) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

40. Scoop (2006, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Scoop (2006) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

41. Cassandra's Dream (2007, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Cassandra's Dream (2007) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

42. Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

43. Whatever Works (2009, IMDb, Wikipedia):

Whatever works (2010) title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

44. You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger (2010, IMDb, Wikipedia)—thank you Mick Barlow Stringer] for sending this in, too:

You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger (2010)  title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

45. Midnight in Paris (2011, IMDb, Wikipedia)—screen capture contributed by Alex Constantinescu (also Yves):

Midnight in Paris (2011)  title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

46. To Rome with Love (2012, formerly titled "The Bop Decameron," IMDb, Wikipedia):

To Rome with Love (2012, formerly titled «The Bop Decameron») title sequence with Windsor font, Woody Allen, screen capture from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

47. Blue Jasmine (2013, IMDb, Wikipedia), poster fragment—thank you Yvves:

Blue Jasmine (2013) poster fragment with Windsor font, Woody Allen, image from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

48. Magic in the Moonlight (2014, IMDb, Wikipedia), poster fragment:

Magic in the Moonlight (2014) poster fragment with Windsor font, Woody Allen, image from Kitblog.com by Cristian Kit Paul.

Book covers

Mere Anarchy (2007)—out of his many books, it seems that only this one complies to the rule:

Mere Anarchy (2007) book cover, photo Cristian Kit Paul, Bucharest, 2008.

It seems Windsor Regular though, not Elongated, nor Condensed.

***

Final

Truth is, I don't know whether this is a Kubrick-eque case of typographic fetish4 or if Woody Allen built a visual identity in order to brand his products.

Contribute

As you can see, the are a few titles left without a confirming screenshot. If you happen o have (or have access to) the respective movies, please submit the missing screenshots (along with your name and URL if you don't want to remain anonymous).


1 See Trajan is the Movie Font, a satire on Trajan clueless overuse in cinematic typography.

2 From Manhattan (1979) opening monologue: "Chapter one. He was as tough and romantic as the city he loved. Behind his black-rimmed glasses was the coiled sexual power of a jungle cat.—I love this.—New York was his town and it always would be."

3 Wikipedia page on Windsor specifies: "Windsor is an old style serif display typeface created in 1905 by Eleisha Pechey. Besides the basic font it is also available in two other styles, Light and Roman. Various foundries introduced minor variations so that today there are versions by Linotype, Elsner+Flake, URW+++, Mecanorma and Stephenson Blake."

4 "Futura Extra Bold was Stanley's favourite typeface. It's sans serif. He liked Helvetica and Univers, too. Clean and elegant." Citizen Kubrick, The Guardian, Saturday March 27, 2004.

Comments

Reply no.: 1

17 Dec 2007, 1:19 AM

iancu:

I guess Woody applied the universal rule "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" :). He found one typo recipe that worked well with his movies and stuck to it.

Or maybe he thought that if someone one day will place all his films one next to the other, they should look like books from the same publishing house and author, bearing the same spine layout :)

Reply no.: 2

17 Dec 2007, 7:51 AM

Kit:

Speaking of films as books, it's interesting that the poster and the DVD cover are often designed in a way that has nothing to do with the movie's title sequences. Woody Allen's movies can epitomize this school of thought where the two are disjunct.

Reply no.: 3

22 Dec 2007, 5:26 PM

Stefan:

This is one of the entries that I consider a reason enough to read this blog.
Just had to state this.

Reply no.: 4

22 Dec 2007, 7:46 PM

Kit:

Thank you, Stefan. This entry took months (and it's not yet complete).

Reply no.: 5

18 Jan 2008, 6:53 PM

itc_james:

I believe the title sequence issue is covered in the book "Woody on Woody". It's been awhile since I've read it, but here is what I can remember. 1) He was given a budget of let's say $200,000 for title sequences. So, the less he spends on titles the more he can spend elsewhere or "make up", if he was running over budget. 2) It was also an homage to the late great Ingmar Bergman who also used the same typeface repeatedly. Another homage, to Bergman, was the absence of music in Annie Hall. And remember, Woody wanted Bergman to appear in Annie Hall as the director in the theatre scene. However Bergman refused to leave Faro.

Reply no.: 6

18 Jan 2008, 7:18 PM

Kit:

These are excellent insights, James, thank you for sharing!

I knew about his utmost admiration for Bergman, but not the details you are mentioning here.

Reply no.: 7

19 Jan 2008, 2:13 AM

Jason Tselentis:

I read something very very similar to this years ago: http://contactsheet.org/articles/woodys_typeface.html

Reply no.: 8

19 Jan 2008, 5:34 AM

John Coulthart:

Michael Cimino also used white Windsor on black for (IIRC) The Deer Hunter and Heaven's Gate. Don't have copies of his other films to hand to check those.

There's a few other directors who do this with titles but they're rarely so consistent across such a length of time as Woody Allen. Offhand the main one I can think of is John Carpenter. I haven't seen a film of his for years but he used to favour white Albertus on black for his titles.

Reply no.: 9

22 Jan 2008, 6:17 PM

"Woody Allen and Windsor Elongated" at dj misc:

What is it with Woody Allen and Windsor Elongated? The stand-up comedian slash writer slash auteur director has used the little known font for the titles of at least 24 of his 43 (yes, that’s forty-three) films. Cristian ‘Kit’...

Read more in Woody Allen and Windsor Elongated »

Reply no.: 10

28 Jan 2008, 2:51 AM

Stephen Coles:

As a FontShopper, I'm biased, but here's a much better link to Windsor Elongated if you're interested in actually seeing the glyphs in detail.

Woody and Windsor have also been discussed on Contact Sheet and Typographica.

Reply no.: 11

28 Jan 2008, 9:43 AM

Kit:

Thanks for the links, Stephen.

I have credited Scott Steffens’ Contact Sheet already—a few captures originate from there. The Tipographica thread doesn't shed too much light into this, though (they're more focused on Signs and Catch Me If You Can).

Reply no.: 12

30 Jan 2008, 8:47 PM

mz:

26. Bullets Over Broadway (1994) complies.

[image supplied]

Reply no.: 13

30 Jan 2008, 9:53 PM

Kit:

Thank you, MZ! Your image is posted.

I just bought the DVD in the weekend—along with Mere Anarchy, the book—got it on my table, still wrapped. Funny coincidence. I'm glad you sent it, nevertheless.

Reply no.: 14

31 Jan 2008, 12:47 AM

mz:

no problem! it's among the few movies of his that i still haven't watched.

(and thanks for the compilation. great stuff!)

Reply no.: 15

31 Jan 2008, 2:04 AM

gerald`:

the cover for "mere anarchy" depends on the edition and publisher; I'm at work at a bookstore and our covers are matte black, with Woody Allen in white, Mere Anarchy in orange (with the Y falling away from the rest of the word), and the whole thing in a lightweight modernist sans serif whose name I can't remember

Reply no.: 16

31 Jan 2008, 2:37 AM

Tim:

Kit,

Speaking as both a Woody Allen & typography obsessive, great article! All of the missing films on your list comply with Woody's use of Windsor. Actually I can't speak for Cassandra's Dream, as I haven't seen it yet.

I've e-mailed you screen shots of the titles you're still missing.

Reply no.: 17

31 Jan 2008, 4:48 AM

Maza:

Oh my god, YOU ARE SO WRONG. I'm sorry. No, it is not EF WINDSOR ELONGATED. It is EF WINDSOR LIGHT CONDENSED. Please compare the images of the titles credits you show and the previews availables at Fonts.com

I'm so right! Please, correct your entry. I almost spent 35 dollars at EF buying the wrong font!

Maza

Reply no.: 18

31 Jan 2008, 8:46 AM

Kit:

Tim, you've made my day! I've inserted your seven screen-shots.

Thank you for your contribution.

And BTW, your photos are awesome.

Reply no.: 19

31 Jan 2008, 8:53 AM

Kit:

Gerald, regarding Mere Anarchy, it seems that the cover of the European edition differs from the American one.

Reply no.: 20

31 Jan 2008, 10:59 AM

Bert Vanderveen:

Wes Anderson is another director with a type fetish. He appears to be a big fan of Futura Bold and Black (ish). Even almost all graphics IN his films are set in those, eg packaging, signs, and so on.

Reply no.: 21

31 Jan 2008, 2:14 PM

Jerry Zigmont:

Interesting post...

If you are a die hard Woody fan and would like to get info on his jazz band, check out my website & blog
http://www.jerryzigmont.com

Thanks!

Reply no.: 22

31 Jan 2008, 2:53 PM

Stephanea:

Very usefull post. As a Woody allen fan, I have always loved the sentiment of unity given by its titles.

Reply no.: 23

31 Jan 2008, 4:24 PM

tim:

It's a terrific example of how a film's tone can be set by aspects that are almost universally-overlooked by critics and scholars.

In my perfect world, there'd be an Academy Award for typesetting or type-writing. There was, actually, such an award in the first two years of the Oscars -- but as "talkies" replaced the silent film, the need to recognize those who engineered visual text production faded as well.

Reply no.: 24

31 Jan 2008, 7:50 PM

Tom Ross:

I have to second Maza. The font you link to is not the font found in your screen captures of Woody Allen's movies.

Just take Annie Hall and compare the A, the H and the a. They're all different.

a: Woody has a drop, Elongated doesn't
A: Woody's horizontal bar is quite centered, Elongated has it rather low
H: Woody's horizontal bar is rather high, while Elongated's is centered

The font Woody Allen used does indeed look more like Light Condensed.

Reply no.: 25

31 Jan 2008, 7:55 PM

Tom Ross:

Sorry, I meant to say:

a: Woody doesn't have a drop, but Elongated does.

Reply no.: 26

31 Jan 2008, 8:35 PM

Kit:

There's an old Romanian saying that—loosely translated—goes like this: When a person tells you that you’re drunk, ignore it. When two persons warn you that you’re drunk, you better go to bed.

So Maza, Tom Ross, I guess I have to admit that you may be right. It looks more like Light Condensed, indeed.

Still, some of the titles are set in a visibly heavier weight—just look at Stardust Memories, The Purple Rose of Cairo or Hannah and Her Sisters—I doubt it can be an off-the-shelf Light Condensed.

Reply no.: 27

31 Jan 2008, 9:03 PM

pnk:

I saw the trailer for Cassandra’s Dream this weekend, and if that's any kind of useful indication it looks to me like W.A.'s changed direction for his next film. I can't say for certain, but I remember thinking it looked like Myriad in the titles, which seemed sort of shocking!

Reply no.: 28

31 Jan 2008, 10:19 PM

Finazio:

Real great!

Reply no.: 29

1 Feb 2008, 1:40 AM

ilan:

brilliant!
thanks

Reply no.: 30

1 Feb 2008, 10:40 PM

"Story about Woody Allen's favorite typeface" at Boing Boing:

Kitblog has a nice piece about Windsor-EF Elongated, the typeface Woody Allen uses in the titles of nearly all his movies. It includes screengrabs of lots of Allen movies that use white Windsor on black. How did Woody Allen chose this typeface? In a pr...

Read more in Story about Woody Allen's favorite typeface »

Reply no.: 31

1 Feb 2008, 11:21 PM

Francis:

"Don't Drink the Water" is strangely sloppy -- the apostrophe isn't curvy (compare to the apostrophe in "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy"), and the spacing around the apostrophe is far too wide.

Reply no.: 32

2 Feb 2008, 8:03 AM

Soojin Lee:

Whenever I watch a Woody Allen film I've never seen before, the opening credits serve as Pavlovian conditioning for me. I see the white Windsor-EF Elongated and a warm smile embraces my being, for I know that the next 100 minutes of my life will be enraptured by a dialogue between my two favourite Allen characters: wit and heart.

Reply no.: 33

3 Feb 2008, 6:33 PM

Mark Simonson:

It's definitely Windsor Light Condensed, not Elongated. The variations in weight in the titles are most likely due either to differences in exposure or the use of different versions of Windsor Light Condensed.

Places like Photo-Lettering Inc. in NYC (where Ed Benguiat created hundreds of typeface designs) often offered finely graded weightings of popular designs. So, if you wanted something like Windsor Light Condensed, but a little bolder or a little lighter, you could get it. Even with the tens of thousands of digital fonts available today, there are whole libraries of fonts that have never been digitized. Just because all we have today is a handful of Windsor fonts doesn't mean that's all there has ever been.

Reply no.: 34

4 Feb 2008, 9:08 PM

Tony:

This is a wonderful discovery. You've done quite a bit of legwork on this piece of trivia.

This is really neat. Thanks.

Reply no.: 35

4 Feb 2008, 10:38 PM

Kit:

Thank you for taking the time to comment and to spread the word.

Reply no.: 36

7 Feb 2008, 3:46 AM

"Ich bin ein Bilder-Opfer! … äh Kunstliebhaberin" at Amys Welt:

Jawohl. Und weil dem so ist und ich meine Liebe für Photos & Bilder bestimmter Leitmotive einfach nicht verbergen kann (und mit LeserInnen großzügig teilen will!), hier einige Highlights der letzten Wochen: Die Photos auf dooce.com...

Read more in Ich bin ein Bilder-Opfer! … äh Kunstliebhaberin »

Reply no.: 37

8 Feb 2008, 7:38 PM

Kyle Meyer:

A modern example of this would be Wes Anderson's obsession with yellow Futura.

Reply no.: 38

17 Aug 2008, 4:11 PM

suburbanrambler:

i just finished viewing his latest films 'victoria christina barcelona' and 'cassandra's dream' and they both comply with the rule. there is a certain comfort in watching a group of work that has a thread, even in minute details such as fonts for its credits. i love that you've done a substantial research on the obscure [well to most of the populace anyway] a subject as typography, a subject that interests me. and especially as it pertains to the oeuvre of woody allen, another area of interest.

you've a very nice blog about design!

Reply no.: 39

17 Aug 2008, 6:39 PM

Kit:

Thank you, Suburbanrambler—I'm glad you find this post of interest. I'll add the latest movies as soon as I can get my hands on the DVDs.

Reply no.: 40

18 Sep 2008, 4:29 PM

Reply no.: 41

27 Jul 2009, 12:21 PM

Yvves:

First comment: ok, Mighty Aphrodite is set on 2 lines, but Vicky Cristina Barcelona is set on 3. Hence, the sentence "it’s interesting that this one is the only title I found set on two lines (the rest are one-liners)" has to be updated.

Second comment: as said in other comments, it might be interesting to show films that are not compliant. You will find here (http://www.contactsheet.org/articles/woodys_typeface.html) some examples, such as Bananas, Everything..., Sleeper, Love & Death, Interiors.

Third comment: on your IMDB list, you can remove the 36 (The Concert for New York City), which is only the big concert in which can be seen the 35 (Sounds From A Town I Love).

Anyway, thanks for your wonderful post, thanks for the updates you make with each Woody new film.

Reply no.: 42

20 Aug 2009, 7:02 AM

Christopher Whalen:

Yves is right: nos 35 and 36 refer to the same film, which is available here on YouTube.

A great post on a lovely looking blog. I initially found a post about this issue on Contact Sheet (to which you refer), but wanted to find confirm exactly what font it is as I'm thinking of buying it.

The publicity material (poster and website) for Whatever Works appears to use the familiar EF Windsor Light Condensed, but the font used in the trailer is a lowercase sans serif.

I always enjoy the familiarity of Woody Allen's title sequences. You kinda know what you're getting. They're more exciting to me than the James Bond pre-title sequences.

Reply no.: 43

10 Sep 2009, 4:09 PM

Peter:

A new take on Windsor, and on Woody Allens titles:

http://www.fountaintype.com/news/2009/09/heroine-movie-trailer

Reply no.: 44

17 Sep 2009, 11:48 PM

Kid In The Front Row:

Very interesting post. I think it's great that he's kept it simple over the years and is something that I, as a filmmaker, try to comply with.

Reply no.: 45

28 Oct 2009, 9:33 PM

Yvves:

Updates :
1/ Whatever obviously respects the rule and teh title is dispatched on one line only (on the contrary of Mighty Aphrodite and Vicky Cristina Barcelona).
2/ Your 44th item, has an official title: You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger. For sure it will be compliant, the only remaining question is: on how many lines will it be dispatched?

Reply no.: 46

3 May 2010, 9:11 AM

Kit:

Thank you, Yvves — added You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger to the list.

Reply no.: 47

22 Jul 2010, 9:44 PM

haortor:

Nice! omg! never thought of that!

Reply no.: 48

8 Mar 2011, 5:31 AM

Tom:

what is the brand of his glasses??

Reply no.: 49

21 Mar 2011, 3:56 PM

Yvves:

It seems that Midnight in Paris will (of course) be compliant:

http://www.firstshowing.net/2011/van-gogh-brings-color-to-woody-allens-midnight-in-paris-poster/

Reply no.: 50

24 Apr 2011, 5:45 PM

Ed Benguiat:

All very nicely worded and all technically correct.
Thank you all for the factual feedback on Mr. Allen.
One other person needs a little thanks for his opinion
on the use of Windsor was Corbet Monica, who was at the dinner
every Sat & Sun.
He played in the movie "Broadway Danny Rose"

Reply no.: 51

6 May 2011, 2:16 PM

Yvves:

Congratulations for these wonderful updates (including non compliant titles). There are now 3 "particular" titles:
* Mighty Aphrodite set on 2 lines.
* Vicky Cristina Barcelona & You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger set on 3.

So you can updates comments of films 28 ("(the rest are one-liners" is no more true), 42 & 46.

Reply no.: 52

11 May 2011, 2:44 PM

Yvves:

Interesting interview in a french paper about the links between Paris and Woody:
http://teleobs.nouvelobs.com/articles/woody-allen-echouer-a-paris-c-est-mieux-que-reussir-ailleurs?page=7

But there is an interesting story about Windsor font.

I translate it:

- You often work with the same people, same music sources, the same characters... Even your credits are written in the same font, Windsor...
- I have my little habits. When I started, it was the fashion of crazy credits, as in "Pink Panther", and it absorbed half of the film budget. So I tried to do the same, but cheaper. For the generic "Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex", the art director asked me to shoot a white room with white rabbits, which were sexual symbols. We have therefore hired two hundred. But on arrival, the rabbits were all crowded into a compact pile. We needed one more. We rented two hundred more! Same result! We then rentall white rabbits in Paris, there must be five thousand! And it still was not enough! At this point, I decided to keep it simple. And I have never changed.

Reply no.: 53

6 Jun 2011, 10:58 PM

Dush:

can anyone tell me what is the beautiful font used in the famous 'HANNAH AND HER SISTERS' posters.
http://www.impawards.com/1986/hannah_and_her_sisters.html

Reply no.: 54

14 Jul 2011, 1:18 AM

Marie de Paris:

Can anyone tell me what fonts are used in Woody Alen's new Midnight in Paris for the previews? The titles read: Font#1 Paris is in the Morning Font#2 is beautiful.

Font#1 Paris in the afternoon Font#2 is charrming

The title sequence had me running to my Mac to see if I could find something similar to Font#2, which is also beautiful.

Reply no.: 55

3 Sep 2011, 3:43 AM

JP:

I make banners and to make one for midnight in paris, i did a little research and i believe the font used by woody is actually
this one:
BELWE MEDIUM
xeck it here...
http://fontzone.net/font-details/Belwe+Medium+BT/

Reply no.: 56

14 Mar 2012, 5:10 PM

Yvves:

http://annyas.com/screenshots/updates/midnight-in-paris-2011-movie-title-typography/

For Midnight in Paris.

For the next one, it seems that, for the 4th time (after The Wrong Picture then The Bop Decameron then Nero Fiddled) the title might be To Rome With Love...

Reply no.: 57

9 Apr 2012, 3:06 PM

Yvves:

To Rome With Love also seems to match:
http://www.impawards.com/2012/to_rome_with_love.html

Reply no.: 58

6 Aug 2012, 1:12 PM

Yvves:

Apparently, Woody also did it on the plays he directed in 2003, see this:

http://theater.nytimes.com/mem/theater/treview.html?res=9C0DE6DB163EF935A25756C0A9659C8B63

"The projected title of each playlet, "Riverside Drive" and "Old Saybrook," is in the white-on-black typeface that Mr. Allen always uses for his film credits. (For the font-savvy, it's Windsor Light Condensed.)"

Woody has written approximately 10 plays, he directed only 3 ("Riverside Drive" and "Old Saybrook" in 2003, and "A Second Hand Memory" in 2004). It would be funny to see some photos of the Windsor part of these plays (for the 2004 play, I even don't know if he did).

Any NY inhabitant who would share that (I did not find anything on the Web so far)?

Reply no.: 59

24 May 2013, 6:50 PM

Yvves:

Once again, the 2013 opus should match, cf. the film poster:
http://news.moviefone.com/2013/05/20/blue-jasmine-poster-debut_n_3306656.html

You can add #47 "Blue Jasmine" (imdb tells us that the film is now completed).

Reply no.: 60

28 May 2013, 2:34 PM

Kit:

Appended. Thank you again, Yvves.

Reply no.: 61

21 Nov 2013, 11:51 AM

Reply no.: 62

14 May 2014, 7:12 PM

Reply no.: 63

23 Jul 2014, 12:44 AM

Yvves:

You may have noticed that the unseen Men of crisis (1971) has appeared these last few days on youtube (with italian subtitles !).
It of course has no Windsor font, as this links shows:
http://www.woodyallenpages.com/2014/07/lost-history-men-of-crisis-the-harvey-wallinger-story-the-woody-allen-pages-review/

You can add this fim between Bananas and Play it again, Sam (so between 4 & 5).

Reply no.: 64

23 Jul 2014, 6:47 PM

Yvves:

At last, Men of crisis can be seen on youtube. You can insert it between Bananas and Everything...

Of course, no Windsor thing in this:
http://cdn.splitsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/menofcrisis.jpg

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